As part of the Test and Learn approach within the TED Ageing Better in East Lindsey programme we are collecting case studies to showcase those individuals living in East Lindsey who have dealt with the isolation and loneliness that TED is tackling. Along with collecting information passed to us from our Delivery Partners across the district.

Case studies are in-depth investigations of a single person, group, event or community. Typically, data are gathered from a variety of sources and by using several different methods (e.g. observations & interviews).

Case studies are a valuable tool which can help the TED programme to demonstrate the impact of the services we provide, whilst giving a valuable insight into the lives of our volunteers and beneficiaries; framing their experiences, life journey and any teachings they would like to share.

Value of the First Connection

Celebrate a beneficiaries journey through the TED project, highlighting how one connection can change a life. Pauline shared her story below:

Value of the first connection

TED Value of first connection – POEM 1

TED Value of first connection – POEM 2

Age-friendly Business

Please enjoy this insight into the further development of the Age-friendly Business arm of the TED programme from May-August 2018.

 

TED Learning – Age-friendly Business

 

 

CHAPS Cooking

We have been given a lovely article from the CHAPS Programme that Magna Vitae deliver for the TED Programme. Please have a read into the goings on during their cooking sessions.

 

TED Learning – Chaps Cooking

 

From the Case Studies completed in the TED Programme this is some of the learning collected:

The role of Friendship Groups in tackling isolation and loneliness:

  • TED Friendship Groups, especially in rural areas, are a vital source of support.
  • TED Friendship Groups provide a safe space for older people to meet others and socialise.
  • Through taking an asset based community development approach, Friendship Groups can be self-sustaining.
  • TED Friendship Groups have experienced particular success where they have collaborated with local businesses that have regular contact with vulnerable people in the community.
  • The quality and quantity of relationships matter, but you can’t manufacture friendship traditional befriending approaches don’t work for everyone, however Friendship Groups can offer an alternative, group based befriending offer.

Age-friendly Business and Accessibility:

  • ‘Place’ encounters can heighten the sense of bodily vulnerability that many older adults experience. Therefore, Age-friendly facilities are important to participants.
  • Activities should be local. This is particularly important for those who have mobility and health needs.
  • Asset based community development plays is an essential element of any work to address social isolation – successful interventions include build on what is already there

Engaging Businesses:

  • Local businesses offer places and opportunities to meet, as well as essential services to older people who may not be able to travel.
  • Businesses have the opportunity to facilitate (social) connections within a community.
  • Simple improvements such as making some basic accessibility alterations and providing clearer signage can have a huge impact for older customers.
  • Businesses often have assets that they can offer to the wider community, which can benefit older people and boost their company’s profile.  In East Lindsey this has resulted in two Age-friendly Businesses hosting regular Friendship Groups.

Supporting and engaging older men in East Lindsey:

  • More women are involved with the TED programme with 59% of people identifying as feral and 39% male.
  • Older men gravitate towards specific activities, learning a new or utilising an old skill, rather than socialising or chatting and will connect with each other over time and through the shared experience of that activity.
  • Older men are more engaged when there is no pressure to do all of a set activity; allowing instead participate at their own pace, including the option of sitting and watching others.
  • Older men are more likely to attend events/sessions which require with no minimum commitment each week. Drop in sessions have been particularly successful.
  • Older men often have preconceived ideas about local venues, for example as being ‘for women’ or ‘for old people’. These perceptions may make them less likely to engage with activities taking place in these venues.
  • Older men may take a longer time to ‘open up’ within a new group. For activities that only last a few weeks, with a set end date, it can mean that the activity finishes just at the point when the individual is feeling comfortable.